Archive for July, 2013

See on Scoop.itArtful Interventions

February 2013 | Volume 70 | Number 5
Creativity Now! Pages 22-27

A Recipe for Artful Schooling

Eric Booth

By nourishing the latent artistry that exists in each student, teachers can spark creative engagement in any subject area.

It drives arts educators crazy. We have deep knowledge about creativity, but we’re usually peripheral to the central education conversation about it in the United States, watching technology and engineering being taken more seriously. We notice that the arts are sometimes offered a seat at the table, but we feel viscerally how little of what we know is used to advance the creative learning agenda.

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This avant-garde seminar series is addressed to organizational leaders, corporate executives and inspired professionals that wish to exhilarate their passion…

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See on Scoop.itThe Eclectic Researcher

QuestionsForLiving is an active research project based on the philosophy that the quality of one’s life is determined by the quality of one’s questions.

See on www.questionsforliving.com

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Massey News (press release)
‘Invisible Foot’ kick-starts workplace theatre at Massey
Massey News (press release)
Dr Taylor specialises in organisational theatre – the performing of plays in workplaces to effect transformational change.

See on www.massey.ac.nz

Arts-based research

Posted: July 23, 2013 in Uncategorized

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Defines Arts-based research using examples (Arts-based research: http://t.co/xzkofeq5aw via @YouTube)

Rachel Lovie‘s insight:

A concise video demonstrating the benefits of using art-based methods in eliciting aesthetic knowledge, addressing power imbalances, and collecting data that goes beyond the cognitive-intellectual-rational with research participants.

See on www.youtube.com

Emotions Can Change Your DNA

Posted: July 22, 2013 in Uncategorized

See on Scoop.itThe Eclectic Researcher

Scientific evidence in the last half century clearly shows that your emotions, the good ones and the bad, affect you in multiple ways: health, schoolwork, job performance, relationships and much more.

See on www.heartmath.org