Archive for April, 2014

Scarfolk Council

Posted: April 27, 2014 in Uncategorized

See on Scoop.itArtful Interventions

“Scarfolk is a town in North West England that did not progress beyond 1979. Instead, the entire decade of the 1970s loops ad infinitum.”

Rachel Lovie‘s insight:

Lovely spoof from Richard Litter.

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See on Scoop.itThe Eclectic Researcher

This is probably the most fascinating interview I have ever done. Sergio knowledge of the Dreaming Realities is unlike anything I have ever heard before… T…

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See on Scoop.itThe Eclectic Researcher

Just a mirror to flipside reality

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See on Scoop.itThe Eclectic Researcher

The existence of the shaman illustrates that insanity and sanity or the irrational and the rational are very closely linked.

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See on Scoop.itJungian Organisational Theory

Contemporary social science applied to a secure, balanced human relationship with our earthly environment through an emergent Unifying Science, change to the collective unconscious and systemic holism.

 

If psychology is by definition work with the soul. And if nature and culture have soul, then psychology must concern itself with this larger sphere.
Hillman argues strongly against reducing soul to personal subjectivity, naming personalism as one of the burdens of the modern era.

 

Psychology assumes that only humans are persons, and therefore we are given the impossible responsibility of carrying the full weight of soul. We tend to interpret everything in terms of personal relationships. Even therapy is often defined as the interaction of two persons, and the goal in therapy is the personal development or growth of the private individual.

 

The soul is not of itself personal. Of course the psyche presents itself in images of persons and in personal feelings, but it is more than personal. Carl Jung used the phrase objective psyche, suggesting that when we look into the soul we are looking at something with its own terrain, its own history and purposes, and its own principles of movement and stasis… (Click title for more)

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See on Scoop.itJungian Organisational Theory

What happened to our innocent “wide open” connection with the natural world — that unedited desire to plunge into the falls? Many people are beginning to ask this question, and the answers, that some are arriving at, point to an exciting new understanding of psychological healing. The psychological pain experienced by many may be due to a perceived, and profoundly felt, alienation from the natural world. If so, healing may come about from a reunion of psyche and nature.

 

In 1992 two books came out that began to unsettle the community of modern psychotherapy practitioners and their clients: James Hillman and Michael Ventura’s We’ve Had 100 Years of Psychotherapy and the World’s Getting Worse and Theodore Roszak’s The Voice of the Earth. Both of these books called into question the modern practice of psychotherapy in the face of the continued decline of the natural world. Both authors assert that the suffering an individual experiences is linked to more than their personal story, it is connected to the suffering of the earth and the nurturing systems that sustain us. This extends the realm of human experience to include the world around us and brings the possibilities for… (click title for more)

See on www.naturalchoice.net

See on Scoop.itJungian Organisational Theory

Rather than calling it obliteration, Schopenhauer proposed that art and the creative could offer deliverance and that it should be elevated above mere consumer driven artisanry and decoration. He said that participation in art and the creative could in fact offer temporary deliverance from strife. Schopenhauer believed that participation in the creative could provide people with religious like experiences and salvation could be attained through aesthetic experiences. Carl Jung’s concept of participation mystique seems to describe this concept which is defined as a person or group of people who unwittingly place themselves under a kind of spell. The concept of  participation mystique was first introduced  by anthropologist Lucien Levy-Brühl. He described it as a state of being when we become one with others and are undifferentiated from the mass. A temporary abandonment  of cares, the voices in our heads gone, the envelopment into ”One voice”, as Springsteen described it, momentarily free.

 

 

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